The Goldfinger

The Goldfinger

  • Mikeglass11

    MikeGlass11.jpg

    131.0KB

    2014/07/14

  • Mikeglass10

    MikeGlass10.jpg

    68.0KB

    2014/07/14

  • Mikeglass8

    MikeGlass8.jpg

    146.0KB

    2014/07/14

  • Mikeglass9

    MikeGlass9.jpg

    119.0KB

    2014/07/14

  • Mikeglass7

    MikeGlass7.jpg

    60.0KB

    2014/07/14

  • Glassesdemokeyshot.36

    GlassesDemoKeyshot.36.jpg

    276.0KB

    2014/04/18

  • Mikeglass15

    MikeGlass15.jpg

    114.0KB

    2014/07/15

  • Mikeglass16

    MikeGlass16.jpg

    99.0KB

    2014/07/15

Description
Wearables continue to be an exciting and growing industry with a whole range of problems technology can solve. In this case I've made a glasses concept to help guide me on my trip through San Francisco. Where do you see wearables being the most useful? I designed these glasses customized for my face. I started by taking a scan of my face with my iPhone using 123D catch. I imported to Fusion and amended several sculpted glasses concepts to see which fit my face the best. From there I integrated a microusb charger and added conceptual decals t show what I think the display should look like. I built a custom wooden case too.
Comments
User_x176
almost 3 years ago

Hi Mike, I suggest to use some sort of transmitter/receiver (depending on the latest technology, like BlueTooth, NFC, or RF combined) with Induction type charging. Then your glasses will be completely wireless. This way, I can see that the glasses can receive 3D signal from movies, computers, sketchboards, or trackpads. The idea can be endless. Just imagine Fusion has an option to transmit to your glasses, then you can just make design without a computer and you can see it "With Your Own Eyes in the Clouds!" For now, I think the Watcom board with SketchBook Pro can connect to your glasses with RF transmitter/receiver. Please develop your idea and have some big guys producing them. That is better than hardwiring into human brains!

User_x176
almost 3 years ago

Hi Mike, actually the 123D programs sometimes do have some good points. I think their 123D Design might be a good program for people interested to taste 3D designing before going into something like Fusion360. By the way, are you planning to make these glasses? Try to make the whole thing in Polycarbonate (PC). Then you can have a complete manufactured unit without any assembling. Polycarbonate are being used for Prescription Glasses and Sun Glasses now. It is 3 times harder than PMMA (Acrylic). I am using PC to make my commercial sets too. The very thin expensive luggage are made with Polycarbonate and you know how good they are. PC used to cost more than PMMA (Acrylic) but now the prices are similar. PC is easier for Injection, Extrusion or Rotational Molding method. I do not think PC is available for 3D printing yet. If they found a way to use PC in 3D printing then it might be possible for anyone to make their own glasses according to their own prescription and their own facial contour. Isn't that a wonderful idea?

User_x176
about 3 years ago

Terrific Mike Aubry, the concept is outstanding! Thank you for sharing this with the community. Body-borne computers are most certainly the trend of the future for us to ride in like a sailing ketch on the seas to planets like Mars in an augmented reality. To answer the question of your statement I see wearable's being most useful as a type of technology life vest to aid in Homeland Security. With natural disasters on the rise and a potential asteroid strike in 2030, mankind must be proactive in the exploration or exodus of consciousness to an ARK RAID array triangulated above our earth. This can be accomplished rather easily via algorithmic crowdsourcing code interfaced with a Teutonic gateway. Math is the key to expanding and unlocking the potential of the human brain as our thoughts and memories are encoded into a spreadsheet for not only storage but continued kinetic stimulation. I'll have to find a way to make my way South West of where I am now to propose I scan the Hollywood Goddess Sandra Annette Bullock to be a muse for humanity's continuum and living namesake of the SAND'RA BULL'OX albedo app that I have geo-tagged her with as The Defender of Mankind.

More from the publisher
Loading...
X176
Mike Aubry
Lake Oswego, Oregon, United States of America

The license and other terms for contributing and using assets in the Autodesk Gallery are found in theAutodesk Terms of Use.

Statistics

  • 260
  • 3
  • 5
Industries

Categories

Products

Tags

Autodesk Online Gallery

© 2014 Autodesk, Inc. All rights reserved.

All use of this Service is subject to the terms and conditions of the applicable Autodesk terms of service accepted upon access of this Service.

This Service may incorporate or use background Autodesk technology components. For information about these components, click here: http://www.autodesk.com/cloud-platform-components

Trademarks

Autodesk, the Autodesk logo, and Fusion 360 are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., and/or its subsidiaries and/or affiliates.

All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective holders.

Third-Party Software Credits and Attributions

Ruby gems is Copyright (c) Chad Fowler, Rich Kilmer, Jim Weirich and others. Portions copyright (c) Engine Yard and Andre Arko

bootstrap-select.js is Copyright (C) 2013 bootstrap-select

Backbone.js is Copyright (c) 2010-2013 Jeremy Ashkenas, DocumentCloud

Apple-Style Flip Counter is Copyright (c) 2010 Chris Nanney

imagesLoaded is Copyright © 2013 David DeSandro

jQuery is Copyright 2013 jQuery Foundation and other contributors http://jquery.com/

jQuery timepicker addon is Copyright (c) 2013 Trent Richardson

jQuery ColorBox is Copyright (c) 2013 Jack Moore

jQuery.gritter is Copyright (c) 2013 Jordan Boesch

Masonry is Copyright (c) 2013 David DeSandro

Underscore is Copyright (c) 2009-2013 Jeremy Ashkenas, DocumentCloud and Investigative

Reporters & Editors

underscore_string is Copyright (c) 2011 Esa-Matti Suuronen esa-matti@suuronen.org

Icanhaz.js is ICanHaz.js is Copyright (c) 2010 Henrik Joreteg (Mustache and Mustache.js are Copyright (c) 2009 Chris Wanstrath (Ruby) and Copyright (c) 2010 Jan Lehnardt (JavaScript) respectively)

Calendario is Copyright (c) Codrops 2014 by tympanus

All the above software components are licensed under the MIT license.

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.


Portions relating to lightbox are licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/). Lightbox was authored by Lokesh Dhakar (lokeshdhakar.com).