Nike Air Max 90

Nike Air Max 90

  • am90e2.jpg

    134KB

    2013/09/05

  • am90a.jpg

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    2013/09/05

  • am90b.jpg

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    2013/09/05

  • am90c.jpg

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    2013/09/05

  • am90d.jpg

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    2013/09/05

  • am90f.jpg

    248KB

    2013/09/05

  • am90g.jpg

    149KB

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  • am90i.jpg

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    2013/09/05

Description
My homage to the greatest sneaker ever! If anyone is interested in seeing the modelling process, let me know and I'll put together a step-by-step guide.
Comments

Yes please thank you!

over 1 year ago

Yes please thank you!!!!

almost 2 years ago

Que massa! Valeu!

over 2 years ago

Hi Jake, I still remember this design that was created in 2014. Real lovely design! Hope to talk to you again soon!
Kingson

over 3 years ago

Good

over 3 years ago

Jake, you should keep upload nice project to the Gallery!

over 4 years ago

Did you end up getting the tutorial done?

almost 5 years ago

Bravo

almost 5 years ago

HI, definitely would love to know how you did this, please put me together with the step by step guide. thank you!

over 5 years ago

Slick modelling skills Jake. All that knowledge finally paid off :)

over 5 years ago

Hi Jake, This is fantastic. I'd really love to see your process.

over 5 years ago

Hey Jake, this is fantastic, what is your email I would love to get in contact with you

about 6 years ago

You got skills like it keep up the good work !

about 6 years ago

Thanks for the very nice feedback everyone, and sorry for the delay on the tutorial. Working on this now, will get it out there asap!

over 6 years ago

Process Please!

over 6 years ago

process please.. some of the techniques you created are what i was looking for... you just made my day!

over 6 years ago

can i see the process

over 6 years ago

Incredible models - the stitches seem a little to close and solid. The renderings feel somewhat flat maybe a different HDRI file would work better or using a different render engine.

almost 7 years ago

Nice work Jake. I would really like to see the process also.

about 7 years ago

Woah, Jake. This is incredible. Agree with Vincent and Adele - looking forward to seeing the process for this project! (Love the nod to the Portland design scene, btw!) :)

about 7 years ago

Great model! Here you go!

about 7 years ago

blown away.

about 7 years ago

Jake, It's not cheating at all! Your effort gives all of us out here a chance to see what can be done in Fusion 360 when you know your way around. As for me, the screen sharing sessions I've had with Andy of late are proving to be time well spent! I welcome the opportunity to get some one-on-one input from you as well. My goal is to master Fusion 360 or to come very close to it! But to achieve this, I need to garner as many insights around F360 behavior as possible. By knowing what to expect, I'm confident I can model most anything. Thanks for elaborating on the workflow used for the embossing. There is a tremendous need from a product branding perspective to be able to incorporate 3D logo marks in the created geometry. My goal for the embossed example I post to the gallery was twofold: 1) Understand how to import a 2D graphic (.dxf, .IGES, etc.) that is directly usable without need to redraw and 2) Create the feature with respect to the desired pull direction and appropriate draft angles. I achieved the offset, but came up a little short on the draft. I tried to sweep a surface around the perimeter of the "K" letter form and perform a cutting operation to achieve the draft, but was not successful on this attempt. Also I constructed a few construction planes through various regions of the "K" to use as hinge planes for drafting. This worked fine for the top and bottom faces of the "K", but other area are in question of working. All in all the process is cumbersome, but doable. Please forward the info for your alternative workflow to vince@idesigninspiration.com

about 7 years ago

I'm really impressed with the cleanliness of the model ... It would be really interesting "steal" a few secrets!

Fabio

about 7 years ago

Oh and yes, renderings are from KeyShot!

about 7 years ago

Thanks everyone!
Hi Vince – yep, was all done in Fusion 360. I work on the team though, so that’s probably cheating a bit, right? I’ll post some workflow pics as soon as possible, would really like to share how this was done.
I spotted your post on embossing earlier (you’ve been in touch with Andy, right? I’m in the same office as him at the mo :) ) I have a couple of workflows I generally use for this. For these logos: I drew the sketch lines on a plane (using a canvas image for reference), created a 0-distance offset surface of the faces I wanted to emboss onto, used the Split Body command to split that surface into the pieces of the logo, then thickened each piece and used the Join operation to attach to the base solid. This gives you an embossing normal to the surface, which is probably appropriate for the plastic pieces on these shoes – but for other moulded parts, you might want the embossing to be in the pull direction. I have another workflow I use for that, but it’s a bit more complex. I’ll drop it to you in an email if you’d like.

about 7 years ago

Agree with Vincent, looking forward to seeing the advanced course-ware from you Jake!

about 7 years ago

I want to buy, if it has my size! Awesome!

about 7 years ago

Jake, Nice work! - Am I understanding correctly that you modeled the entire shoe inside of Fusion 360? If this is so, you have a very nice command of the tool. I'd appreciate seeing your modeling process. Snapshots of the major steps will be fine even without much written description. Or you could share the model. I'm particularly interested in which tools and operations inside Fusion 360 you used to achieve the raised logos of "Nike" and "Air Max" Did you use Keyshot for the rendering - Thanks, Vince

about 7 years ago

Wow, the detail. Nice renderings too. Well done!

about 7 years ago

The first Fusion model I ever tried was a sneaker I think… it was an embarrassing mess (but a great crash-course in T-Splines). I’d post a pic if I had one but I probably deleted the model out of shame. Anyway, treated myself to pair of these a couple of weeks ago, so gave it another shot!

I found creating a shoe was a great way to get some intermediate practice with freeform modeling. It’s quite a complex form in 3D, so you need to consider the shape as more than just a set of 2D projections.

about 7 years ago

Jake, these Nikes are impressively detailed. Very well done! Tell me, what motivated you to model this?

about 7 years ago
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Jake Fowler
United States of America
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