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Sailboat 3D Printable

Sailboat 3D Printable

  • Boat_render

    Boat_Render.png

    928.0KB

    2015/02/11

  • Boat_render_from_below

    Boat_Render_from_Below.png

    531.0KB

    2015/02/11

  • Dinghy_1to4_scale

    Dinghy_1to4_Scale.jpg

    3592.0KB

    2015/04/09

  • 20150429_203912_resized

    20150429_203912_resized.jpg

    978.0KB

    2015/05/01

  • 20150429_203952_resized

    20150429_203952_resized.jpg

    985.0KB

    2015/05/01

  • Dinghy_prettier_ray_traced

    Dinghy_Prettier_Ray_Traced.png

    1013.0KB

    2015/08/18

  • Dinghy_prettied

    Dinghy_Prettied.png

    301.0KB

    2015/08/18

  • Dingy_with_sail

    Dingy_with_Sail.jpg

    87.0KB

    2015/11/23

  • 3dmodelthumbtraninprogress80x80
Description
Designing a dinghy "framework" that can be printed in several pieces (currently 13 parts make up the hull). Working through various connection options/systems (that are somewhat material dependent), designing "fittings" into the hull to eliminate most hardware (and there cost), and so on. Once done, anyone should be able to "mod their own dinghy". If a dozen sailing clubs in a region can each buy a low cost 3D Printer, together they can print a whole dinghy maybe once a week - for not much more then the cost of the raw materials (under $1000). In a year, a group of sailing clubs can print a fleet of dinghies. And let the kids go wild moding their very own boat! Shades of the old days when one built one's first dinghy in the garage with dad. The first photo is my first 3D print at 1:10 scale. About 4 hours for each of the 15 sections. It took about a week (Ultimaker 2 in PLA). Have tweaked the design and now starting to print a 1:4 scale version - which at 20 hours per section will take about 2 weeks to complete. The second photo is the mostly complete 1:4 scale printed model (learned a few things during this larger scale printing process that drove a bit of redesign). Next is finding a large enough printer to print a full scale 1:1 9 feet long (assembled) dinghy I can really sail (need a printer with a 24x24x18 inch print volume...still researching).
Comments
Default_avatar

Jim are you still working on this project? If yes shoot me an e-mail to sailcrab at rocketmail.com; If not, is there any place I can get .stl's?

2 months ago
User_x176

Dinghies and many race boats have quite flat bottoms. Not about the tool. Note the top/deck and sides started as flat sudes of a rectanglar cube. Pretty easy to change the slopes/curves. I also did some surface tweaking to get a better 3D Print result - as overhangs and gentle curves parallel to the print bed lead to surface finish problems.

over 4 years ago
X176

Hi again, thanks for your answer. Yes I did see the integrated parts such as the handles and I really like the idea.
I did notice before that the bottom of the hull is very flat, which is understandable if you started with a rectangle :-). I am no naval architect or have any expertise (other than owning a sailboat) in the area but I tried making the hull lofting lines as you mentioned, which I did not succeed with in Fusion. But I should do some googling and see if I can make an easy hull shape.

over 4 years ago
User_x176

Everything was done in Fusion 360. Took a bit to sort out how to best work with the Sculpt modelling - changing mesh density to get the right curves in the right places. Playing with grips to get uniform smooth surfaces. The boat hull is made from 3 different Sculpted bodies (main hull, mast support, rudder support) that were booleaned after I finished getting the Scultped bodies "right". Spent more time on the "connection system" then on the boat hull. This was my first serious design - which I have about 30 hours into (and three weeks printing). I spent a few hours on my first attempt to design a dinghy in Fusion which forced me to learn how to use the various Fusion tools/capabilities. Then second time I "went big" on the dinghy you see. Note the hull started with a rectangular Sculpt body with port/starboard symmetry (not by lofting curves as a naval architect would likely try to do... I just haven't figured out how to best use Fusion lofting to get a "complete" clean hull). I spent quite a bit of time on things like jam cleats (take a close look at the jam cleats built into the deck at the forward end of the cockpit) - as I want to eliminate the need for any expensive stainless hardware - and eliminate assembly labor/tools/expertise. The gooseneck design is another example of eliminating hardware - as is the rudder shaft/bearing.

over 4 years ago
X176

Have you designed everything in Fusion? I found your project searching for information on how to create hulls in Fusion. Do you have any tips on how to do it? I have tried it before in Rhino where it was quite easy, but I can't seem to find an effective way in Fusion.

over 4 years ago
User_x176

The 1:4 scale model weighs in at about 3 pounds. Hoping to bring the full scale 9 foot long dinghy in at under 60 pounds (easy for 2 kids to launch). Still a long way to go with internal structure design to keep weight down. Interesting thought to hook up some servos to the model and go RC sailing. Wouldn't be much work to mod the design to nest servos - and add a lead shoe to the centerboard. Though my passion is a full size dinghy for well under $1000 so anyone and everyone can afford to have the freedom of their own sailboat.

over 4 years ago
X176

Really cool project! Have you tried making a RC-model of it to try it out? I was wondering about the weight, what is the projected total weight of it when 3d-printed?

over 4 years ago
User_x176
Jim Quanci
California, United States of America
OPEN/DOWNLOAD THE MODEL

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